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Writer Uses Rejection to Land Writing Gigs

Writers and other creative entrepreneurs probably receive more rejections than most. It’s a competitive world, requiring a thickskin. A recent story by Bob Greene on CNN tells how one writer, Chuck Ross, once turned rejection in his favor and made a name, and writing career, for himself.

Ross is a classic self-starter. In brief, after realizing that agents and publishers weren’t even reading the mystery manuscript he submitted, Ross sepia.writing    submitted a verbatim top-seller to see if they would bite at it. He submitted the copied top-seller without the real title or author’s name, and sat back to wait for 27 reviews. Not a single agent or publisher bit on the National Book Award winner.

The lesson? First, Ross took the rejection of someone else’s work even less personally than he had viewed rejection of his own writing. Second, he made lemonade out of lemons. Ross submitted a feature article to a local magazine about the best-selling manuscript submission and rejection. Soon, he was landing plenty of writing work and quit his day job.

After all, what Ross really wanted was to be a writer, and now he was making a solid living at it. This self-starter, who dreamed big, but was willing to adjust his vision, took risks and kept his passion alive. As for rejection, he laughed at it in the face and in print. And he won.

How can you take a similar situation and use it to your advantage?

kevinb